A Day Job

Writers need a day job. According to a survey of almost 2,500 working writers the median income of the professional author in 2013 was just £11,000, a drop of 29% since 2005 when the figure was £15,450. The typical median income of all writers was even less: £4,000 in 2013, compared to £5,012 in 2005 (The Guardian). So unless you’re lucky enough to make a really good living from your writing – cue JK Rowling – you need a day job.

For me, finding the right day job was a calculated decision; I downsized my career. I had arrived at a place I didn’t want to be, so I stepped off the career train. This sounds so simple, doesn’t it? It wasn’t. I remember thinking, Is this the most stupid thing I’ve ever done? But I still did it: I walked into the unknown. It took a long time to find the right part-time day job; and then settling in at the bottom of an organisation, even though it is a college of art and design was, shall we say, trying. Setting about establishing my proofreading and copy-editing business and getting it off the ground was easier.

Most people don’t follow their dreams. ‘They settle for the ordinary, as if they’re afraid of potential greatness inside them. Following your dream can be lonely, as it sets you apart from others. Just because it’s the right thing to do doesn’t make it easy.’ (Robert Rowland Smith)

 

 

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